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Art goes International, Study Abroad in Argentina

Lila Miller, Art & Entertainment

cave-ascibi

Previous group, pictured within Cave Ascibi during an excursion. Promotional photo. 

Art students and non-art majors now have a chance to study abroad in the cultural hub of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Armstrong’s study abroad program is offering a summer 2017 excursion to Buenos Aires for three weeks. Participating students will have the opportunity to select several classes for university credit to study while exploring.

Armstrong is offering Drawing one and two, Painting one and two, Art in Argentina (utilizing the art medium of your choice), Argentinian Culture, as well as Forensic Anthropology.

While studying, students will stay in a wide array of accommodations such as a neighborhood called Recoleta and nearby prestigious neighborhoods Palermo and La Boca. Students will visit historical and cultural sites like the Plaza de Mayo, Casada Rosada and Recoleta Cemetery.

During their stay, students will visit world-famous classical museums, view urban street art and murals and cultivate their art against a background of Argentina’s vibrant culture. Students will also encounter some indigenous cultures of Argentina as they trek from the city to the countryside.

Students will then travel to Northwest Argentina, to Spanish colonial city, Salta. Salta has a population of 370,000 but “feels much smaller.” It is known throughout the region for its stark blue skies, diverse climates and indigenous peoples. Participants will stay for five days, close to the downtown area, with access to shops, additional museums, holy cathedrals, and theaters.

Perhaps most notable event occurring during this portion of the trip will be the Grand Gaucho Parade. This parade consists of over 3,000 Gauchos, dressed in traditional red and black striped ponchos, leather chaps and black boots, riding into town on their horses from all over the area.

Students will also be visiting pivotal landmarks like the Ignesia San Francisco, the Cathedral, as well as the Museum of High Altitude Archaeology. The museum hosts the mummies of three Incan children discovered frozen on top of Mount Llullaillaco. Further immersing themselves into the cultures of indigenous peoples like the Wichi, Chané and Calchaquí, students will complete service projects and learn from master artisans in the area.

Towards the tail end of the trip, participants will also be staying on a family ranch in the Andes, taking hiking excursions, photographing mountain lakes and learning about pre-Inca civilizations that once lived in the area. Students will also visit the highest-elevated winery in Argentina, the Colomé.

Previous student of the program, Christine Powell, explained, “I fell in love with the variety of landscapes we were fortunate to experience while visiting Argentina and Bolivia. My artwork, inspired by the trip, will hopefully help a handful of others to relive many extraordinary memories and ignite in others a desire to someday visit South America.”

The trip is open to all students, as well as non-students. Though it is of particular interest to art majors, no previous art experience is required to expand education from the classroom to a different country. The program lasts from June 12–July 2, 2017. The deadline to apply is Jan. 31, 2017. The cost of attendance is $3,400, plus tuition, though financial aid is available.

For more information, please contact Rachel Green in the fine arts building, room 205, or via email at rachel.green@armstrong.edu.

About The Inkwell (1153 Articles)
A compelling news source at Armstrong State University since 1935.

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