Tag Archives: student feedback

A Quick History On Book Burning

An Age Old Tale of Censorship

Rachel Hammond, Staff Writer

The Statesboro campus recently had an incident involving the burning of a book by Jennine Capó Crucet. The book, “Make Your Home Among Strangers,” follows a Latina who gets into an ivy-league school, and tells of her struggles in a mainly white society.

The controversy was sparked during Crucet’s Q&A when a student said to Crucet, “I noticed that you made a lot of generalizations about the majority of white people being privileged.” The student went on to question Crucet’s qualifications and her overall purpose for coming to the campus.

Following Crucet’s talk, several students gathered on campus to burn their copies of the book.

Book burnings are not a new concept. In his 2015 article in the Daily Beast, “Bonfires of Insanity: A History of Book Burnings From Nazis to ISIS,” Robert Corn-Revere says that this form of protest has been in existence since the Qin dynasty.

In 213 BCE, Chinese Emperor Qin Shi Huang ordered that history and philosophy books that went against his own beliefs be burned.

“In the 20th Century, book burning is most closely associated with Nazi Germany, and for good reason–the Nazis wanted to be known for it,” Corn-Revere states.

In 1933, Nazi youth burned over 20,000 books in a bonfire in Berlin. The books that were burned included themes that went against Nazi ideology. 

 

“They’re just being too rash about it and not looking at it from another person’s perspective.” –Makayla Brown, Dual-enrollment student

 

More recently, according to “’I see parchment burning, but the letters are soaring free’” by Jeff Jacoby from the Boston Daily Globe, ISIS used book-burning as a form of censorship in 2015. The terrorist group broke into the Central Library of Mosul, Iraq and destroyed thousands of philosophy, science and story books. A member of ISIS was reported saying, “These books promote infidelity and call for disobeying Allah. So they will be burned.”

Several students weighed in with their opinions on the book burning incident on the Statesboro campus.

“When people act harshly like that, I just don’t think they’re acting as they should. They’re just being too rash about it and not looking at it from another person’s perspective; they’re only thinking about themselves. And I really think people need to just step back, count to 10, and just look at the other side instead of acting so harshly,” said Makayla Brown, a dual-enrollment student.

The student body of Armstrong was asked to weigh in with their point of view on the book burning incident at Statesboro. Here are their responses.

“I think it’s stupid that they did it. I think there are other ways to practice what we believe instead of setting someone’s book on fire and following them to their hotel. I mean, I think they had every right to do what they did but I don’t think it was okay,” said Jordan Whitaker, a junior in elementary education.

Previous news reports stated that students followed Crucet to her hotel, but these claims have since been proven false.

 

“I believe white privilege is a topic that needs to be talked about. A lot of people don’t really notice some of the things that they’re able to do. And it’s not to make anybody feel bad, but it’s just something real that needs to be talked about.” –Justin Crosby, senior elementary education major

 

“I think for anyone if your only way of arguing is shutting the other person out then you’ve already failed your point,” said Johnathan, a junior in IT Services. Johnathan preferred not to give his last name.

“I understand that it’s their freedom of speech, so they have the right to feel that way, but I think there’s a more respectful way to go about showing your disagreement with the topic,” said Justin Cosby, a senior elementary education major.

“I believe white privilege is a topic that needs to be talked about. A lot of people don’t really notice some of the things that they’re able to do. And it’s not to make anybody feel bad, but it’s just something real that needs to be talked about,” said Cosby. 

“I feel like there’s a lot of overreaction [to the book burning]. I feel as though they were well within their rights to have burnt the book, based on the first amendment. I do believe that they should not have mobbed their hotel. I don’t know exactly what she said but I’m sure that if it was bad enough to have burnt a book, I fully support that,” said an anonymous student. 

 

Student Quotes on Book Burning Incident

Here’s the quotes we’ve collected over the past few weeks from students with their thoughts on the Statesboro campus book burning incident.

 

When people act harshly like that, I just don’t think they’re acting as they should. They’re just being too rash about it and not looking at it from another person’s perspective; they’re only thinking about themselves. And I really think people need to just step back, count to 10, and just look at the other side instead of acting so harshly.

Makayla Brown, dual-enrollment student

 

I think it’s stupid that they did it. I think there are other ways to practice what we believe instead of setting someone’s book on fire and following them to their hotel. I mean, I think they had every right to do what they did but I don’t think it was okay.

Jordan Whitaker, junior elementary education major

 

Johnathan, who preferred not to give his last name, said, “I think for anyone if your only way of arguing is shutting the other person out then you’ve already failed your point.”

Johnathan is a junior in IT Services.

 

I understand that it’s their freedom of speech, so they have the right to feel that way, but I think there’s a more respectful way to go about showing your disagreement with the topic… I believe white privilege is a topic that needs to be talked about. A lot of people don’t really notice some of the things that they’re able to do. And it’s not to make anybody feel bad, but it’s just something real that needs to be talked about.

Justin Cosby, senior Elementary Education major 

 

I feel like there’s a lot of overreaction [to the book burning]. I feel as though they were well within their rights to have burnt the book, based on the first amendment. I do believe that they should not have mobbed their hotel. I don’t know exactly what she said but I’m sure that if it was bad enough to have burnt a book, I fully support that.

Anonymous

 

The book burning was very distasteful and not classy at all. I am in fact, disgusted that Georgia Southern is not taking any action against the students involved. They did not even give them a slap on the wrist. All this talk of diversity and inclusion, yet you cannot understand how you have privilege? I could respect it more if they just actually asked, “I do not understand how I have privilege, can someone explain to me?” This is more than right now, this is generations of proven history repeating itself.

Ricky Perkins, Armstrong Campus NAACP President, senior Public Health major

 

The entire situation is disappointing. We can’t progress if we ignore the experiences of another. Instead of burning her book, it would have been more appropriate to discuss the matter further in FYE or organized a student-led debate. I wish they would’ve allowed the author to elaborate more on how white privilege is a very real thing.

Deja Wright, Junior, Sociology

 

I think the whole thing was just… stupid. Like, who even cares that much about what a book says? At the end of the day it’s just words on paper. Yeah sure they had the right to do it but that doesn’t make it not dumb. I hope the author doesn’t stop doing her tours because of this.

Anonymous, Sophomore, Biology

 

Disappointed but not surprised.

Ivan Acha

 

They put others in danger… White sensitivity is a real thing. If you don’t think you benefit from w.p. [white privilege], then open your eyes.-

Kareem El-Hadi, senior biology major 

 

I don’t really care. I am minding my own business.

Charlie Conger, sophomore 

 

 

Students Talk Global Warming

Javanna Rogers, Staff Writer

Global warming has once again become one of the most talked about issues around the world recently when teenager Greta Thunberg’s speech at the U.N. Climate Action Summit on Sept. 23 went viral.

Glaciers are melting, temperatures are rising and animals are losing their homes. 

According to National Geographic, “Climate change encompasses not only rising average temperatures but also extreme weather events, shifting wildlife populations and habitats, rising seas, and a range of other impacts. All of these changes are emerging as humans continue to add heat-trapping greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.”

Students were asked how they felt about climate change and there were various answers given.

Shakeem Albany, a sophomore, said, “Mother Earth need to get it together. Put trash in the right spot. Respect the area around you.”

According to The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), “On Earth, human activities are changing the natural greenhouse. Over the last century the burning of fossil fuels like coal and oil has increased the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). This happens because the coal or oil burning process combines carbon with oxygen in the air to make CO2. To a lesser extent, the clearing of land for agriculture, industry, and other human activities has increased concentrations of greenhouse gases.” 

It goes on to say, “If the warming were caused by a more active Sun, then scientists would expect to see warmer temperatures in all layers of the atmosphere. Instead, they have observed a cooling in the upper atmosphere, and a warming at the surface and in the lower parts of the atmosphere. That’s because greenhouse gases are trapping heat in the lower atmosphere.”

Industrial Products such as cars, factories, machinery and gas have produced greenhouse gases that goes into the atmosphere. 

Megan Carlisle, a housing staff member, said, “I am not having children until real steps are taken toward the reversing/preventing climate change.” She then quotes Greta Thunberg exclaiming “You have stolen my dreams with your empty words.”. 

Gabby Baxter, senior, said, “I feel that climate change is REAL. People should be taken seriously. Just because it’s not affecting you doesn’t mean its not hurting others.”

Zay Munoz, senior, said, “It’s a big deal. I am  the problem with climate change. I leave it to the other people to fix it.

To find out more about climate change and how yo can stop it, go to:

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/global-warming/global-warming-solutions/

Climate.nasa.gov

Nationalgeographic.org